October 14, 2014

thebluepeninsula:

look at this fucking tiramisu cake i am so dead right now this has killed me

October 13, 2014
Apple Pecan Pies via A Beautiful Mess

Apple Pecan Pies via A Beautiful Mess

October 13, 2014
Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Maple Bourbon Cream Cheese Icing via Free People

Pumpkin Spice Cupcakes with Maple Bourbon Cream Cheese Icing via Free People

October 2, 2014
The Racist Myth of MSG and ‘Chinese Restaurant Syndrome’

lolitabandita:

zuky:

This is the story of a racist myth that began with a light-hearted letter to the New England Journal of Medicine in 1968 and subsequently exploded in North American culture — in direct opposition to every shred of scientific evidence — becoming so prevalent that credulous eaters buy into it to the point of experiencing its effects on a purely psychosomatic basis. 

It’s often been called “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome” and its premise is that MSG in Chinese food results in unpleasant allergic reactions. Interestingly enough, higher quantities of MSG in non-Chinese foods are not reported to have the same effects. MSG is a naturally occurring amino acid, and some of the highest levels of MSG a North American consumer is likely to ingest come in vine-ripened tomatoes, aged cheese, and dry-aged steak — yet there is no reported medical phenomenon known as “Italian Food Syndrome” or “American Steakhouse Syndrome”.

Monosodium glutamate was first isolated from the seaweed kombu, commonly used in the Japanese broth dashi, by biochemist Kikunae Ikeda of the Tokyo Imperial University in 1908. He named its taste umami because it differed from the five conventional flavours of sweet, salty, sour, bitter, and spicy. Ikeda patented his discovery and MSG became commercially available in 1909. It was found to enhance flavours with one third of the amount of sodium as traditional salt, i.e. sodium chloride. In this sense, monosodium glutamate is probably healthier than sodium chloride because it achieves flavour with reduced sodium levels.

MSG was immediately popular in Asia and became common in the North American food industry after World War II, used in baby food, canned soup, vegetable juice, frozen food, as well as seasoning mix brands such as Accent. Yet somehow in the 1960s, this popular food additive became associated with Chinese food and deemed a health hazard. Why? Because Chinese people, culture, and food have been targeted by widespread and effective racist hate campaigns in North America since the 19th century, buttressed by wild claims that the Chinese are “unclean”, carry diseases, are sexually-deviant opium addicts, inscrutable and sneaky, a Yellow Peril. 

The 1968 letter to the New England Journal of Medicine which solidified the myth of MSG was actually written by a Chinese immigrant named Robert Ho Man Kwok, who described “numbness at the back of the neck, gradually radiating to both arms and the back, general weakness and palpitation” after eating in American Chinese restaurants. The letter opened the floodgates to a barage of letters and related articles complaining of headaches, dizziness, paralysis of the throat, tingling in the temples, tightness of the jaw, irregular heartbeat, depression, hyperactivity, and all manner of digestive ailments. 

Given this preponderance of anecdotal evidence, numerous scientific studies have been performed since then attempting to identify this “Chinese Restaurant Syndrome”. The funny thing is that no study has ever been able to do so. When people don’t know that they’re consuming MSG, they don’t suffer adverse reactions. All national and international food safety bodies have concluded that MSG is perfectly safe. People in Japan eat MSG every single day and the Japanese have the longest life expectancy in the world.

Fear of MSG is a racist remnant of the Chinese Exclusion era which exists only in North America and has been thoroughly debunked by science. Yet racist socialization is so powerful that people actually experience physical effects such as headaches, depression, and indigestion based solely on their indoctrinated fear of Chinese people and Chinese food. Think it over next time you eat parmesan cheese or a vine-ripened tomato.

I’ve been waiting for this post to happen

(via arabellesicardi)

October 1, 2014

kateoplis:

Oh, hello October.

  1. Fried apple pies
  2. Brie + cheddar apple beer soup w/cinnamon-pecan-oat crumble
  3. Crockpot pork ramen w/curry roasted acorn squash
  4. Sweet-n-spicy roasted butternut squash pizza w/cider-caramelized onions + bacon
  5. Roasted vegetable salad w/garlic dressing
  6. Cranberry-butternut-brussels and brie skillet nachos
  7. Sweet and salty bourbon cinnamon pecan caramel apples + chocolate drizzle
  8. Nutella banana tarte-tatin w/cinnamon sugar + roasted-pumpkin-hazelnut-crunch

October 1, 2014

(Source: goodhabitsonly, via those-paleo-recipes)

September 16, 2014
Gnocchi di Zucca via Free People

Gnocchi di Zucca via Free People

September 16, 2014
Orange Chicken via The Pioneer Woman

Orange Chicken via The Pioneer Woman

September 16, 2014
Shells & Cheese (with Bacon & Peas) via The Pioneer Woman

Shells & Cheese (with Bacon & Peas) via The Pioneer Woman

September 9, 2014
peegaw:

masterchefonfox:


Submitted by Notions and Notations of a Novice Chef
For the final MasterChef mystery box challenge at home we have: Chorizo, Rosemary, Asparagus, Orechiette, AP Flour, Ground beef, Grits, Canned baby corn, Garlic powder, White rice and Butter.
It’s my personal favorite basket, since the ingredients are all pretty versatile and don’t have the tendency to point to one specific cuisine. My submission is pretty simple and uses three of the above as its main components. Let’s get started:
PARISIENNE GNOCCHI AND ASPARAGUS:
1 cup water
8 tablespoons salted butter
1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
3 large eggs
2 tablespoon chopped parsley
1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
1 lb asparagus
1 1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter
Bring water and water to a boil in medium saucepan over high heat. Add in all the flour and stir with a wooden spoon until a smooth dough forms. Reduce heat to medium low and cook while stirring until the dough pulls away from the sides of the saucepan.

Remove pot from heat and add in the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition to prevent the eggs from curdling. Add in the chese and chopper parsley. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch tip.
Let mixture rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a simmer. Have a rimmed baking sheet ready on the side. Holding the bag over the boiling water, squeeze the mixture out and cut it off with a knife or scissor into 1-inch lengths and let them fall into to water. Continue cutting as many as you can in 1 minute, then stop.
When all the gnocchis have floated to the top, continue cooking for about 3 more minutes. Fish them out with a metal spider and transfer to rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat. Repeat with remaining dough. Set aside to cool for another 30 minutes.

Trim and blanch the asparagus in salted water. Cut into bite sized pieces and set aside.
Heat the unsalted butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Add in the gnocchi and cook until brown and toasty. Add in the blanched asparagus and season to taste.


Grate some parmesan cheese or any cheese you like on top before serving.


Enjoy!

Last one!

peegaw:

masterchefonfox:

image

Submitted by Notions and Notations of a Novice Chef

For the final MasterChef mystery box challenge at home we have: Chorizo, Rosemary, Asparagus, Orechiette, AP Flour, Ground beef, Grits, Canned baby corn, Garlic powder, White rice and Butter.

It’s my personal favorite basket, since the ingredients are all pretty versatile and don’t have the tendency to point to one specific cuisine. My submission is pretty simple and uses three of the above as its main components. Let’s get started:

PARISIENNE GNOCCHI AND ASPARAGUS:

  • 1 cup water
  • 8 tablespoons salted butter
  • 1 1/4 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/3 cup grated Parmesan cheese
  • 3 large eggs
  • 2 tablespoon chopped parsley
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 lb asparagus
  • 1 1/2 tablespoon unsalted butter

Bring water and water to a boil in medium saucepan over high heat. Add in all the flour and stir with a wooden spoon until a smooth dough forms. Reduce heat to medium low and cook while stirring until the dough pulls away from the sides of the saucepan.

image

Remove pot from heat and add in the eggs, one at a time, beating after each addition to prevent the eggs from curdling. Add in the chese and chopper parsley. Transfer the mixture to a piping bag fitted with a 1/2 inch tip.

Let mixture rest for 30 minutes at room temperature. Meanwhile, bring a large pot of salted water to a simmer. Have a rimmed baking sheet ready on the side. Holding the bag over the boiling water, squeeze the mixture out and cut it off with a knife or scissor into 1-inch lengths and let them fall into to water. Continue cutting as many as you can in 1 minute, then stop.

When all the gnocchis have floated to the top, continue cooking for about 3 more minutes. Fish them out with a metal spider and transfer to rimmed baking sheet. Drizzle with olive oil and toss to coat. Repeat with remaining dough. Set aside to cool for another 30 minutes.

image

Trim and blanch the asparagus in salted water. Cut into bite sized pieces and set aside.

Heat the unsalted butter in a skillet over medium high heat. Add in the gnocchi and cook until brown and toasty. Add in the blanched asparagus and season to taste.

image

image

Grate some parmesan cheese or any cheese you like on top before serving.

image

image

Enjoy!

Last one!